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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 56 (some duplicates have been removed)
there is no sign dangerous radiation is coming here. >>> good evening. as we come on the air tonight, the u.s. navy is now racing to the rescue in japan. where there is word that electricity is about to return to the fukushima nuclear plant, and the u.s. is flying in five giant pumps from a navy base in nagasaki. they are pumps that can deliver enormous amounts of water, after we all watched today as the helicopters tried to spray water, but to no avail. our reporters are out in force on the story tonight. and we will go to japan in a moment. but first, let's head to martha raddatz who has been talking all day to the u.s. officials who are now helping the japanese. martha? >> reporter: diane, every day, the nuclear monster seems to get more frightening. but there is some hope tonight from that big u.s. push to send in water pumps. this coming after last ditch efforts by the japanese failed. one expert told us it's like using a squirt gun to put out a forest fire. japanese fire trucks using riot control water hoses to tackle red hot nuclear reactors. helicopters swooping overhead, dropping bucket af
>>> tonight on "world news," question sell it? president obama tells americans why he is risking u.s. fighters and all those billions of dollars in libya. >>> women versus walmart. the nation's biggest employer heads to a showdown in the nation's top court and the subject is sex discrimination. >>> curing diabetes? could surgery -- look at this woman before and now this woman after. could surgery work for 14 million obese americans with type ii of the disease. >>> and seven years old and sexy? a big company selling push-up bikinis for little girls as a lot of americans are wising up today to say it's time to draw the line. >>> good evening and thank you for joining us this monday. in less than one hour the president will take to the airwaves to try to convince americans that it was the right decision for the u.s. to be part of the allied fight in libya. a third battle front for the united states. with a lot of military force on the line and costing possibly billions. our jake tapper is standing by in the hall where the president is about to arrive at the national defense university i
, the u.s., the french, the arabs will all move in. >> let me be clear. these terms are not negotiable. >>> inside hell. for the first time, hear from the workers trapped inside those nuclear reactors when the earthquake hit. and tonight, the head of that plant breaks down in front of the cameras. >>> prince william speaking out and sharing what his grandmother told him about getting through the tough times. >>> and, everyday hero. how one man took one failing school and changed the future of all these kids in just five words. he's our "person of the week." >>> good evening. for one week now, we have been focused on the dangerous unknowns of the nuclear crisis in japan. but tonight, we begin with the unpredictable and dangerous mind of moammar gadhafi. today, president obama told americans that u.s. forces may be called into military action once again, this time, against gadhafi. joining other countries trying to keep the dictator from savaging his own people. tonight, we set out to answer three big questions. will other countries like england, france, arab nations really take the lead
the japanese government has reached out to the iaea, the international atomic agency and the u.s. determined here in a desperate race to avoid a catastrophic meltdown. entire families escaped the shadow of the doomed nuclear power reactors are coming here worried they were exposed to radiation. we were given extraordinary access to the test sites where medical teams used megaphones to direct the parents and children where to go. they're using geiggar counters and hand held scanners checking everyone one by one especially the most vulnerable, the children scanning this little girl's hair and there are countless faces here. there are three nuclear reactors at what is called the fukushima daiichi plant. just two days ago an explosion at reactor one released radioactive material into the air and yesterday a second blast at three releasing more and while dramatic these are not the worst case scenarios. tonight there is growing concern over reactor number two becoming dangerously overheated. inside each of those buildings it's a fiery hot nuclear core. inside a small structure. cool water must be
. america and its allies now just hours away from control of the skies. so what's next for u.s. forces, and what will gadhafi do now? >>> radiation in food from japan. >> fukushima fresh vegetables. >> we do our own tests. >>> and an american family after ten days of hope learns their daughter was lost trying to save others. >>> men, women and jobs. which sex is getting 90% of the new jobs and why? >>> and sibling secrets. are you an older or younger sibling? news about which order gives you an edge in health and happiness. >>> good evening. as we come on the air tonight beginning this week together, the united states is still in the middle of an international assault on moammar gadhafi's libya. but the battle is moving at breakneck speed. it is called "operation odyssey dawn," and as of tonight, the skies are clear. gadhafi's forces have come to a halt though there are still big questions. how soon can the u.s. hand over the lead to other countries? who are these libyan rebels, and are we even on the same side? and what is next? will gadhafi fold, or could this go on for years? we hav
for the u.s. to hand over a huge part of that bold operation over libya. and tonight, an abc news exclusive. martha raddatz with extraordinary access. behind me, you're looking at the "usskearsarge." martha spending hours on board with the american commander. tonight, the latest on these new u.s. plans to hand over partial control and she has ne details about the rescue of those u.s. pilots ejecting from 22,000 feet and tough questions for the commander. will this operation be a success in the end? martha landed back at a u.s. base in italy just a short time ago and has the latest. >> reporter: good evening, david. there are a lot of details to be worked out about that nato plan, but we did spend a remarkable day jumping from warship to warship with the man currently in charge. general carter ham took charge of africa command on march 9th. ten days later, he was at war. and now, he is here, in the middle of the fight, touring the u.s. warships off the coast in libya. he brought the sailors and marines some encouragement from their commander in chief -- >> he said, how are the attacks going?
. >>> and now, we turn to the u.s. fighting forces in libya. and the strongest signal sent today by president obama that is u.s. is ready to turn the lead over to other nations. jake tapper is tackling the issue of does that mean united states troops will be out of harm's way? jake? >> reporter: speaker of the house john boehner sent a letter to president obama demanding to know when the u.s. is going to hand over command and control to that international coalition. the truth is, diane, the white house does not have an answer. they'd like to do it by the end of this week, but it's unclear that will happen. president obama is quiet eager to hand over command and control to the international coalition. >> the exit strategy will be executed this week, in the sense that we will be pulling back from our much more active efforts to shape the environment. we'll still be in a support role. >> reporter: that support role, supplying, jamming, intelligence, is not an exit strategy. it's still a huge commitment, though it would be significantly less than this initial phase in which the u.s. is carrying t
tells americans why he is risking u.s. fighters and all those billions of dollars in libya. >>> women versus walmart. the nation's biggest employer heads to a showdown in the nation's top court, and the subject is sex discrimination. >>> curing diabetes? could surgery -- look at this woman before and now this woman after. could surgery work for 14 million obese americans with type ii of the disease? >>> and 7 years old and sexy? a big company selling push-up bikinis for little girls as a lot of americans are wising up today to say it's time to draw the line. >>> good evening and just a short time ago, president obama took to the air weaves to argue to americans that it's been the right decision for the u.s. to be in libya, to be a part of the allied fight a third battle front if the u.s. he under scored that sus no longer in the lead on the operation. will allows the military force on the line and the cost. jake tapper was there in the hall where the president just spoke. he is at the national defense university in washington still. jake. >> reporter: this evening, president obama exp
. sky scrapers built on springs. it was still devastating. today, scientists in the u.s. say we're unprepared. >> a number of cities are at risk. boston, new york city, charlesson. >> reporter: it's not just california. the most dangerous zone is in the middle of the country. the last big one here was in 1895. and when, not if, when it happens, millions will be left homeless. >> it's a hard, cold slap slab that allows the energy to travel. in california, energy dissipates quicker. >> reporter: jerry is a geologist in memphis. he shows us cities that would not make it. >> in areas that may receive the most damage, you would expect that those fire department buildings may not be operational. >> reporter: the scientists suggest we test early warning systems. they are pushing for more aggressive building codes. and new rules to reinforce our oldest buildings. >> the you look at haiti, chile, christchurch and how to japan, the question would why aren't we getting ready. >> reporter: they're hoping that everyone takes them seriously. >> thanks, steve. >>> as the country weighs how to
sown in the u.s., right now. >>> good evening. not long ago, a cancer diagnosis felt like a death sentence. not anymore. huge numbers of americans, hundreds of thousands more each year, are surviving and living with cancer. numbers just released from the centers of disease control show that 1 in 20 american adults is now a cancer survivor, almost 12 million of us. we are catching cancer earlier and treating it more effectively, and ron claiborne is here with what it all means. this is such encouraging news. >> reporter: this is really important news tonight, george. so many people are now living with and beating cancer. four times as many as 40 years ago. in fact, the cdc said today that for millions of americans, cancer is now a manageable disease. >> reporter: they send us their videos. poignant messages celebrating their struggle against cancer. and more and more americans are winning the fight. the centers for disease control says as of 2007, nearly 12 million adult americans were cancer survivors, people living with cancer or who've beaten the disease, compared to just 3 mill
up in the u.s. milk supply. exactly how much? is it completely safe? we take you inside the laboratory to see for yourself. >>> tornado fury. violent twisters tossing everything in their path, even striking the space center in florida. >>> mega-wow. seven overjoyed coworkers claim that $319 million prize. and we find one of the colleagues who opted out of the ticket that day. what did he say to us? >>> and, coming home. the marine who watched the birth of his first child from the battlefield with us finally gets to hold her tiny hand, right here, tonight. >>> good evening. we begin with america's milk, and that radiation from japan. all day, we have heard the reassurances that the radiation now being found in some of the u.s. milk supply is minimal and poses no risk. so, we spent this day answering some serious questions. since the radiation in some form has been found in 20 states, exactly how much has been linked to the milk and how the are experts sure that it is safe? abc's abbie boudreau is at a lab in california tonight. abbie? >> reporter: diane, with radiation st
searching for u.s. products. all about creating more american jobs. >>> good evening. we begin tonight with a u.s. exclusive, moammar gadhafi. the flamboyant and brutal dictator at the center of the firestorm in libya. today our christiane amanpour became the only american reporter to sit with gadhafi. he refused to acknowledge libyan protesters. he laughed at demands that he step down, even as anti-government forces rage across his country. so let's go right away to christiane in tripoli. good evening, christiane. you sat right across from the man. the whole world is wondering what he'll do next. what did you hear? reporter: well, diane, i see he was relaxed and focused, determined to tell his side of the story. he exhibited no sense of a siege mentality. on the other hand, he remains incapable of realizing that in this country there is an uprising against him. colonel gadhafi emerged from the first of a convoy of cars, greeting us at a beachfront restaurant as the sun set over the mediterranean. in his trademark flowing robes and gold-rimmed aviator shades, he looked every inch the f
with experts asking about the reality of what is happening tonight. martha? >> reporter: diane, the u.s. is now urgently trying to get the japanese government to find more volunteers to go into the nuclear reactors to try to stop multiple meltdowns. the next 48 hours are absolutely critical. one official told me there is a recognition this is a suicide mission, but this is where we are right now. 50 workers inside the plant, working in the dark with nothing but flashlights, wearing overalls and heavy hazardous suits, trying to put out toxic fires with a hose. we are told it is like a horror movie, fighting a monster you cannot see, you cannot touch but you know is coming to get you. tonight, new pictures of the destruction at the reactor buildings. burnt out from fires. europe's energy commissioner saying, "there is talk of apocalypse, and i think that world is particularly well chosen." here is what is so worrying. at reactor one, 70% of the fuel rods are damaged. at reactor number three, smoke is billowing out. an explosion there blew out the roof and outer walls, likely cracking the critical
the lebls in libya. what if he wins? can the u.s. do what it takes to stop him? >>> ripped apart. tornadoes tear across the south. one survivor calls it 30 seconds of pure hell. >>> gadget guilt. when blackberries and iphones take up family time. >>> and, travelers beware. by hotel pictures online are all too often too good to be true. how to tell when they're fooling you. >>> good evening. in the culture war between new and old media and undercover upstart has dealt a major blow to the establishment. public broadcasting has been a lightning rod for years. supporters call npr and pbs a public service, with every penny the taxpayers pay for it. critics say it's wrong for all americans to subsidize what they call a liberal agenda, and they have new ammunition now, after an npr executive was caught on tape in a conservative sting. this caused the head of npr her job and now the federal funding for public broadcasting is under more pressure than ever. jake tapper starts us off from washington. jake? >> reporter: good evening, george. that's right. the ceo of npr submitted her resignation today.
. today, scientists in the u.s. say we're unprepared. >> a number of cities are at risk on the eastern seaboard for major earthquakes. boston, new york city, charleston. >> reporter: it's not just california. the most dangerous zone is in the middle of the country. in the lower midwest. the last big one here was in 1895. and when, not if, when it happens again, millions would be left homeless and billions in damages. >> in the center of the united states, it's like a hard, cold slab that allows the energy to travel. in california, energy dissipates quicker. >> reporter: jerry is a geologist in memphis. he shows us old buildings that would never make it. they were built long before the strict codes. >> in areas that may receive the most damage, you would expect that those fire department buildings may not be operational. >> reporter: the scientists suggest we test early warning systems. which were working in japan and may have made a difference. they are pushing for more aggressive building codes. and new rules to reinforce our oldest buildings. >> if you look at haiti, chile, christchu
, schools and money. well, today, bill gates, whose foundation spends hundreds of millions of dollars on u.s. schools, called out state officials for incompetence, wasting money and making grave mistakes about teaching american kids to succeed. and ron claiborne is here with what was really a wakeup call. >> reporter: that is right, diane. it is not often bill gates, one of the richest people in the world, inserts himself into one of the hot button issues in american politics. but he is doing that now, voicing radical ideas on how to make schools work and sharp criticism about who is to blame for why they have not. at today's conference, the soft-spoken gates was on the attack over how states are dealing with the crisis in american education. >> the guys at enron never would have done this. i mean, this is so blatant. so extreme. is anyone paying attention? >> reporter: for the past year, gates has been focused on how to make schools and teachers better. and how to pay for it. >> state budgets are a critical topic, because here's where we make the real trade-offs. if we make the wrong choice
libya, and tonight, as the u.s. prepares to hand over part of this giant operation, there is no question that u.s. forces and money will continue to be spent. martha raddatz, the only reporter to land on the "uss kearsarge" in the mediterranean, asking tough questions tonight about our overspent forces and our taxpayer dollars. martha? >> reporter: david, while america may be handing over more of the mission to allies here in the region, it's clear that america's servicemen and women will still be bearing a heavy load. and it taxpayers paying a great deal of the bill. this is what the mission of protecting civilians in libya looks like today. british fighter jets high above the libyan desert scouring for targets. just outside a city, a column of libyan tanks threatening to fire. the british lock on, taking out one tank and then another with precision-guided missiles. six tanks destroyed in all. >> gadhafi has no air defense left to him and a diminishing ability to command his forces on the ground. >> reporter: in the past 24 hours, of the nearly 100 strike missions in libya, more than ha
with secretary of state hillary clinton about the u.s. intervention in libya, how we got involved and how it will end. but we bring you a headline tonight. are there signs that colonel moammar gadhafi and those close to him may be trying to find an exit, even though gadhafi appeared on television, promising to win? also, as abc news has reported on "good morning america," libyan diplomats say at least one of gadhafi's sons may now have been killed by a libyan pilot on a kamikaze mission. so, here is what secretary of state hillary clinton told us today about gadhafi and the report about his sons. there's a report that two of gadhafi's sons, at least one, but maybe two, have been killed. can you confirm this? >> well, i can't confirm it, but we've heard it. and we've heard a lot. >> reporter: credibly? >> well, we hear it from many different sources. and that's why i can't confirm it. i can't give any confirmation because, you know, the evidence is not sufficient. but we've heard that. we've heard about other people close to him reaching out to people that they know around the world, afric
gays have a right to do it. >>> terror attack a gunman shouting in arabic opens fire on u.s. troops at an airport in germany. >>> and, made in america. the family who said we could take away everything in their house made overseas, stunned by the truth. tonight, we show them how it looks when we buy only from workers here at home. >>> good evening. they are our parents, our neighbors and we learned today that by the millions they are vulnerable to a kind of invisible elder abuse. it was all brought home by the original all-american kid in the old time movies, mickey rooney who is now 90 years old. he silenced the room on capitol hill of his story of financial abuse, bullying and shake. adding, if it can happen to him, it can happen to anyone. and abc's claire shipman watched it all today. >> reporter: diane, it is estimated that as many as 3.5 million americans are victims of elder abuse. it does have a broad definition. it can be physical abuse, neglect, sheer theft, which is what mickey rooney talked about in his wrenching testimony, where he said all of them can cause devastating
. >> reporter: every u.s. president for the last 40 years has issued the same ultimatum. >> we will finally end our dependence on oil from the middle ice. >> and america's accepted dependence on foreign oil. >> reporter: so how much have we cut our dependence on foreign oil? turns out we haven't. in fact, we rely even more on it. in 1973 the u.s. produced 64% of all the oil it consumed while importing the rest from foreign sources. half of that prosecutor opec. in 2010, 61% of the oil we consume came from overseas, while our piece of the pie shrank to less than 40%. almost ten years after 9/11 and a rededication to reducing oil imports, still no change. >> political will is the main thing that's keeping us from relying less on foreign oil. we can't change things overnight. we need to bring down the cost of alternatives and push them into the economy but in we don't get started now we'll never get there. >> reporter: advancements in technology have inchristed american production but not nearly enough to reduce oil imports. >> the increase in u.s. production is a positive sign. it can't close the
on women in almost 50 years. each day, 72 million women in the u.s. get up and either head to work or look for work. they're a group of women who are better educated than ever before. but they still make less than their male counterparts, on average, only 80% of what a man makes. this woman graduated with a masters from columbia and went to work for a magazine in new york city. her male counterpart with the exact same job and only a bachelor's degree was paid $3,000 a year more. >> i felt devalued. i felt like i didn't count. i felt inferior to my colleague. >> reporter: sometimes it's discrimination, but there are other factors, as well, behind pay inequity. >> one reason is they're not going into the kinds of fields that are high income producing. and so the president, since e l early on in the administration, has had an effort to encourage women and girls to go into science and technology and engineering math. >> reporter: we sat down this afternoon with three professional women to talk about the fact that women still make less than their male counterparts. >> something that i've seen
obama to get the very latest on moammar gadhafi and whether the u.s. will have to go even further, even giving arms to the rebels in libya. today, the rebels seemed to be under assault by gadhafi's forces, taking big casualties. and at the same time, in the nearby country of syria, their president was forced to promise big changes there, streets filled with protesters. but in my interview with the president, i started by asking about gadhafi, and those reports that he is trying to make a deal. as of this moment, any sign gadhafi wants out? >> well, i think what we're seeing is that the circle around gadhafi understands that the noose is tightening. that their days are probably numbered. and they're going to have to think through what their next steps are. but as i have been very clear about throughout, there are certain things they can do that will send a signal that he's ready to go. until that time, we're going to keep on applying pressure and hopefully he's going to be getting the message soon. >> reporter: if gadhafi winds up in a villa some place in zimbabwe, with no war crimes tri
a recovery to a standstill have senators lobbying the president to flood the market with some of the u.s. strategic petroleum reserve. with 727 million barrels of oil, it's the largest reserve on the planet. >> i do believe that the announcement of a strategic petroleum reserve sale would help to moderate escalating prices. >> reporter: but experts differ on how much of a real impact that oil would have on gas prices. >> a lot of what's happening is fear. what could go wrong? but the release of the oil supply maybe reduces a little bit of that fear. >> reporter: the president's response? not yet. and diane, unless things in the middle east worsen, analysts tell us that these gas price hikes will probably take a bite out of the economic recovery but probably won't cripple it. diane. >> okay. we hope, matt, especially now that something else was heading higher today, and this time, welcome news. jobs. a strong 192,000 new jobs added last month. unemployment dropping to 8.9%. and david muir has been looking into these new jobs, where they are, david? >> reporter: welcome news, diane. you kn
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 56 (some duplicates have been removed)

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